Transit of Venus

Transit of Venus

Transit of Venus

Venus, the second planet from the Sun, will pass directly between the Earth and the Sun, will begin at 11pm Nigerian time on Tuesday 5 June and will end at 6am on Wednesday 6 June.

Scientists say during the transit, Venus will appear as a small black dot moving across the surface of the Sun. They claim this to be a rare event and the next one will not happen until 2117. The transit would only be visible from certain parts of the world.

Experts warn never to look directly at the Sun without special eclipse glasses, and not to view it through binoculars or a telescope, which could result in serious injury or blindness.

Scientists and astronomers in the 18th century set out to far-flung corners of the globe to time the transit of Venus. Combined, their results gave them the first accurate measurement of the distance between the Earth and the sun, a figure they calculated to be between 93 million and 97 million miles (172-180 million kilometres). Today, the accepted distance is 93 million miles. The result allowed astronomers to calculate the size of the solar system.

Describing the manner in which the transit will occur, experts say that the tiny disc of Venus is would cross onto the sun in the 8 o'clock position. You may be seeing images that make Venus look like it's entering the sun at around 2 o'clock; that is because depending on the type of telescope, the images you see will be reversed and sometimes flipped left to right.

For those observers viewing the phenomenon directly, the planet appears to be crossing the sun from the lower left.

Venus, the second planet from the Sun, will pass directly between the Earth and the Sun, will begin at 11pm Nigerian time on Tuesday 5 June and will end at 6am on Wednesday 6 June.

Scientists say during the transit, Venus will appear as a small black dot moving across the surface of the Sun. They claim this to be a rare event and the next one will not happen until 2117. The transit would only be visible from certain parts of the world.

Experts warn never to look directly at the Sun without special eclipse glasses, and not to view it through binoculars or a telescope, which could result in serious injury or blindness

Scientists and astronomers in the 18th century set out to far-flung corners of the globe to time the transit of Venus. Combined, their results gave them the first accurate measurement of the distance between the Earth and the sun, a figure they calculated to be between 93 million and 97 million miles (172-180 million kilometres). Today, the accepted distance is 93 million miles. The result allowed astronomers to calculate the size of the solar system.

Describing the manner in which the transit will occur, experts say that the tiny disc of Venus is would cross onto the sun in the 8 o'clock position. You may be seeing images that make Venus look like it's entering the sun at around 2 o'clock; that is because depending on the type of telescope, the images you see will be reversed and sometimes flipped left to right.

For those observers viewing the phenomenon directly, the planet appears to be crossing the sun from the lower left.

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