Igbo Presidency Not Negotiable After Goodluck– Achuzia

Igbo Presidency Not Negotiable After Goodluck– Achuzia

Retired Col. Joe Achuzia, President-General of Igbozurume, an Igbo socio-political organisation, said, yesterday, that Igbo presidency after the tenure of President Goodluck Jonathan was not negotiable.

Achuzie stated this in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria, NAN, in Aba, Abia State.

He said Igbozurume, a political, cultural and social group, was being repackaged to bring the idea into fruition, stressing that it was the same group that helped Governor Rochas Okorocha to win Imo gubernatorial election in 2011.

Achuzia said that was also the resolution at its 3rd National Executive/Steering Committee meeting in Lagos in June that Igbo should have a shot at the presidency after Jonathan’s tenure.

He said: “It must be the turn of  the Igbo to occupy Aso-Rock at the end of Jonathan’s tenure.

“Though Jonathan has the right to re-contest after 2015 by virtue of the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the Igbo must not allow the chance to pass us by this time round after his tenure.”

Achuzia, who is also the Ikemba Ahaba, said that Ohanaeze was formed immediately after the civil war, as cultural and social group which had made it difficult for Ndi-Igbo to come together to identify with one Igboman to capture the presidency.

“The last person we had was Sir Mbanefo who tried with others to create a situation where Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe should present himself when the military decided to give civilian the opportunity to vie for the topmost position.

“After Nnamdi Azikiwe’s attempts, no Igboman had been allowed to venture near that position, the most we have is compensating us for assisting non-Igbo to get into that position and what they gave us was a vice-president.”

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