UK Police Apologise To Family Of Man Killed In G20 Protest

UK Police Apologise To Family Of Man Killed In G20 Protest

UK Police Apologise To Family Of Man Killed In G20 Protest

The British Police has apologised to the family of Ian Tomlinson and reached an out-of-court settlement over his death at the G20 protests in London in 2009.

The force apologised "unreservedly" for the "excessive and unlawful force" used by one of its officers. Mr Tomlinson had been walking home when he was struck with a baton and pushed to the ground by then-PC Simon Harwood.

His widow, Julia, said the apology was "as close as we are going to get to justice". She also said the family could "finally start looking to the future again".

Mr Tomlinson's widow and seven of his children and step-children had pursued the compensation claim. The amount will remain confidential.

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Maxine de Brunner said in a statement: "I apologise unreservedly for Simon Harwood's use of excessive and unlawful force which caused Mr Tomlinson's death, and for the suffering and distress caused to his family as a result."

The statement also said that all litigation between the force and the Tomlinson family had been resolved.

"An out-of-court settlement has been agreed that acknowledges the suffering Julia Tomlinson and the family have endured with dignity over the last four years.

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Maxine de Brunner: "I take full responsibility for the actions of Simon Harwood on 1 April 2009"

Mr Tomlinson, a 47-year-old newspaper seller, collapsed minutes after being struck with a baton and died of internal bleeding, in what was later found by an inquest jury to be an unlawful killing.

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