What You Need To Know About Appendicitis

What You Need To Know About Appendicitis

Appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix, a tube of tissue that extends from the large intestine. No one is absolutely certain what the function of the appendix is. One thing we do know is that we can live without it without any consequences.

Appendicitis is a medical emergency that requires prompt surgery to remove the appendix. Left untreated, an inflamed appendix will eventually burst, or perforate, spilling infectious materials into the abdominal cavity. This can lead to peritonitis, a serious inflammation of the abdominal cavity’s lining (the peritoneum) that can be fatal unless it is treated quickly with strong antibiotics.

Sometimes a pus-filled abscess (infection that is walled off from the rest of the body) forms outside the inflamed appendix. All cases of appendicitis are treated as emergencies, requiring surgery.

Although it can strike at any age, appendicitis is rare under age 2 and most common between ages 10 and 30.

Causes

Appendicitis occurs when the appendix becomes blocked, often by stool, a foreign body, or cancer. Blockage may also occur from infection, since the appendix swells in response to any infection in the body.

Common Symptoms

Immediate medical attention and timely diagnosis and treatment is very important. Do not eat, drink, or use any pain remedies, antacids, laxatives, or heating pads, which can cause an inflamed appendix to rupture.

Diagnosis

Diagnosing appendicitis can be tricky. Symptoms of appendicitis are frequently vague or extremely similar to other ailments, including gallbladder problems, bladder or urinary tract infection, Crohn’s Disease, gastritis, intestinal infection, and ovary problems.

The following tests are usually used to make the diagnosis.

Treatment

Surgery to remove the appendix, which is called an appendectomy, is the standard treatment for appendicitis.

If appendicitis is even suspected, doctors tend to err on the side of safety and quickly remove the appendix to avoid its rupture. If the appendix has formed an abscess, they may drain the abscess of pus and fluid, and later remove the appendix.

Appendectomy: What to Expect

Antibiotics are given before an appendectomy to fight possible peritonitis. General anesthesia is usually given, and the appendix is removed through a 4-inch incision or by laparoscopy. If there is peritonitis, the abdomen is also irrigated and drained of pus.

Within 12 hours of surgery you may get up and move around. You can usually return to normal activities in two to three weeks. After an appendectomy, call your doctor if you have:

Prevention

There is no way to prevent appendicitis. However, appendicitis is less common in people who eat foods high in fiber, such as fresh fruits and vegetables.

Related news

The Face of Okija is not about cucumber - All you need to know about the competition

The Face of Okija is not about cucumber - All you need to know about the competition

The Face of Okija is not about cucumber - All you need to know about the competition